Office-Main House

The E.P. Gavit family of Albany NY, purchased the Tanglewood property in 1915 and commissioned Pasadena architect Reginald Johnson to design a Mediterranean mansion for the estate they renamed Cuesta Linda. The golden age of estates and gardens was beginning and Johnson was at the forefront of a revival type of architecture suitable to the California climate and favoring the Spanish-Italian-Mediterranean building style .

The Main House

The E.P. Gavit family of Albany NY, purchased the Tanglewood property in 1915 and commissioned Pasadena architect Reginald Johnson to design a Mediterranean mansion for the estate they renamed Cuesta Linda. The golden age of estates and gardens was beginning and Johnson was at the forefront of a revival type of architecture suitable to the California climate and favoring the Spanish-Italian-Mediterranean building style . Known locally for his award-winning structures such as the Santa Barbara Biltmore, the Music Academy of the West (the former estate known as Mira Flores), and Santa Barbara’s down-town Post Office, Reginald Johnson continued to build impressive homes in Montecito, Hope Ranch, and Pasadena for several decades.

Reginald Johnson

Known locally for his award-winning structures such as the Santa Barbara Biltmore, the Music Academy of the West (the former estate known as Mira Flores), and Santa Barbara’s down-town Post Office, Reginald Johnson continued to build impressive homes in Montecito, Hope Ranch, and Pasadena for several decades. The house is now used for staff offices and special events and is not a part of the public tours.

Pavilion

Soon after moving into their new home, the Gavit family contracted Montecito architect George Washington Smith to begin alterations to the dining room. Over the next nine years Smith’s office would be responsible for numerous projects on the estate and gardens, including the wall around the property, stables, garages, outbuildings, and a swimming pool with a pavilion. In 1925, the Gavits asked Smith to design a separate pavilion of three-bedrooms, each with dressing rooms and baths. The arcaded loggia along one side is matched by another arcade that encloses the patio between the house and pavilion. The two patio fountains are attributed to Smith, as well the fine wrought iron work inside the patio’s arches and at the windows of the pavilion.

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